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Latino Voters Really, Really Dislike Donald Trump

Donald Trump Shrug

A new poll shows that Donald Trump is viewed overwhelmingly unfavorably by a voting group that is likely to be very important in several swing states that will decide the outcome of the 2016 General Election:

Donald Trump has used the issue of immigration to help make himself the front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination, but his harsh rhetoric also has earned him the highest negative ratings among Hispanic voters of any major GOP hopeful, according to a Washington Post-Univision News poll.

Among Democrats, front-runner Hillary Clinton holds a lead over Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) of roughly 2 to 1 among Hispanics heading toward the Super Tuesday round of primaries and caucuses.

Clinton lost the Hispanic vote in last Saturday’s Nevada caucuses by eight points, according to network entrance polling. The Post-Univision survey was conducted Feb. 11-18, before those caucuses took place. The poll was a joint effort of the independent firm Bendixen and Amandi International and the Tarrance Group, a Republican firm.

Hispanics clearly prefer the Democratic Party to the Republican Party overall and on a host of important issues, though the poll suggests most are not passionate about Democratic leadership or Obama’s presidency.

Strongly negative views of Trump have intensified over the past seven months, as the New York billionaire has repeatedly pressed his call to build a wall along the length of the U.S.-Mexico border and seek to deport undocumented immigrants currently residing in the country.

Today, 8 in 10 Hispanic voters have an unfavorable view of Trump. That includes more than 7 in 10 who have a “very unfavorable” impression of him, which is more than double the percentage of any other major candidate.

Those findings compare with a Univision survey taken around the time of Trump’s announcement last summer, when just more than 7 in 10 had a negative view of him and fewer than 6 in 10 said they had a “very unfavorable” impression.

Should Trump become the Republican nominee, his current low standing among Hispanic voters could jeopardize the party’s hopes of winning the general election in November. In current matchups with Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton, Trump scores worse among Hispanics than any of the three other leading Republican candidates — Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

The Post-Univision survey tested those four GOP candidates against Clinton and against Sanders. While all trail badly among Hispanics at this point, Trump does the worst — losing the Hispanic vote to Clinton by 73 to 16 percent. That 57-point gap is little changed from a 54-point deficit recorded last June, but is significantly wider than the 44-point margin by which former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney lost Hispanics four years ago and bigger than in any presidential exit poll since the 1970s.

Meanwhile, Clinton leads Rubio by 30 points, Cruz by 38 and Kasich by 43. Matched against Sanders, Trump trails by 56 points. Rubio trails Sanders by 24 points, Cruz by 33 and Kasich by 37.

Republican efforts to win a general election hinge in part on whether the party’s nominee can attract a larger share of the Hispanic vote. The alternative is to find additional support among white voters to offset expected losses among Hispanic voters.

The Republican Party and other candidates for the nomination have escaped significant collateral damage from Trump’s candidacy thus far. More than 6 in 10 Hispanic voters said Trump’s views on immigration are not representative of the Republican Party overall.

 

Trump also trails badly among Hispanic voters who lean Republican, suggesting that such voters may stay home or even vote for the Democratic nominee if he were at the top of the Republican ticket:

Trump’s weaker support against Democrats in general election matchups spans demographic groups but is sharpest among Republican-leaning Hispanics. In a matchup with Clinton, 88 percent of Republican-leaning Hispanics said they would support Rubio and 80 percent would support Cruz, but only 59 percent would support Trump against Clinton

These numbers stand in contrast to the bragadocious claims that Trump has made since his campaign started that he would win the Latino vote in a General Election notwithstanding his comments about Mexican rapists and his promises to round up undocumented immigrants for deportation should he become President. They also stand in contrast to the reports that Trump apparently won the Latino vote among Republican caucus goers in Nevada, with some reports saying he won as much as 44 percent of that vote according the Entrance Polling taken as people were entering the caucus on Tuesday evening. Not surprisingly, Trump is highlighting that number, but there is much less there than meets the eye. For one thing, entrance polling is still a relatively new concept in polling and it’s especially unclear in a caucus situation if it ends up accurately reflecting the outcome of a vote. This is especially true when dealing with small subgroups of the larger population of voters, which is a very apt description of Republican-leaning Latino voters in Nevada:

Nevada has a large Latino population, a substantial share of which is undocumented. Among those who are citizens and eligible to vote, the vast — and we really do mean very, very vast — majority of these Latino voters tend to cast ballots for Democrats. In fact, in 2008, President Obama won the Latino vote there 76 percent to 22 percent. He won it by nearly 50 points in 2012. And even that might undersell how much Nevada Latinos lean left.

So, like any election, only some share of this small share of the Latino electorate showed up and participated in the Wednesday Republican caucus to begin with. And, of those who did, Edison’s resources and plans allowed them to check with with a grand total of 100 — that is right, 100 — Latino Republican voters inside of a very limited number of precincts around the state, before these individuals went in and cast a vote.

In other words, this survey has a really big margin of error – about plus or minus 10 percentage points. That means that Trump may have earned as little as 34 percent (still a sizable number) of the Republican Latino vote in Nevada or as much as 54 percent. And, as any third-grader can tell you, that’s quite a range.

As one Latino voting expert The Fix checked with Wednesday morning put it, “I would be exceedingly careful about reading too much into that 44 percent.”

In other words, as Aaron Rupar explains it, the vast majority of Latino voters in Nevada are Democrats or Democratic-leaning independents who will end up voting for the Democratic candidate in the General Election. Given that, the population of Latinos that were inclined to go to a Republican caucus are not really representative of their community to begin with and it would be utterly improper to draw any kind of conclusions from a potentially flawed “Entrance Poll” to begin with. If you’re looking for an indication of where Latino voters are headed in 2016, it’s far better to look to the poll cited above that shows that nominating Trump would likely be suicidal for Republicans when it comes to attracting Latino voters in the General Election.

Losing the Latino vote by the numbers that are suggested in the Clinton-Trump head-to-head matchup in the Univision poll, 73% to 16%, would likely mean that it would be next to impossible for Republicans to win the Presidency in 2016. As it is, exit polls indicated that Mitt Romney garnered 27% of the Latino vote four years ago and ended up losing the election by some five million votes and 126 Electoral Votes. The exit polls from the 2008 election show John McCain did better than Romney, winning 31% of the Latino vote, and yet he too ended up losing by some ten million votes and nearly 200 Electoral Votes. If Trump does become the Republican nominee and this 16% number is even close to being accurate then the GOP would be headed toward Electoral College disaster. Republicans could forget, for example, about winning a state like Florida, which alone would mean that the probability of getting to 270 Electoral Votes would become incredibly low. That low a share of the Latino vote could also put states such as North Carolina, which Mitt Romney won in 2012, in jeopardy, as well as having an impact on Senate races in states such as Florida, Colorado, which some Republicans hope they could flip in the upcoming election, and Nevada, where the GOP is hoping to win an open seat election created by the impending retirement of Harry Reid. Thanks to the way Congressional Districts are drawn, there’s likely to be less of an impact on the makeup of the House of Representatives but the possibility of the GOP losing a handful of seats there thanks to an energized anti-Trump Latino vote shouldn’t be discounted. In other words, nominating Donald Trump would most likely be an Electoral disaster for Republicans. And yet the prospect that this is what will happen is becoming more likely by the day.

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About Doug Mataconis
Doug holds a B.A. in Political Science from Rutgers University and J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. He joined the staff of OTB in May, 2010 and also writes at Below The Beltway. Follow Doug on Twitter | Facebook

Comments

  1. PJ says:

    So, it’s true, Trump is making Latinos build a wall, but it’s an electoral wall. And he’s going to pay for it…

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  2. OzarkHillbilly says:

    :-)

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  3. Bob@Youngstown says:

    Actually he doesn’t call for a wall , that would suggest some level of cooperation from some other entity. What he really said was ” I will build the wall” , seeming to suggest that he alone would construct the wall.

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  4. Ron Beasley says:

    Everyone who isn’t a WASP should hate Trump. The neocons are also hate him. If Trump gets the nomination the neocons will probably support Hillary.

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  5. Guarneri says:

    “Strongly negative views of Trump have intensified over the past seven months…………..,as he seek to deport undocumented immigrants currently residing in the country.”

    Ok. So he’s unpopular with those who break the law or condone breaking the law, and who contribute to wage suppression or support wage suppression and growing income inequality, like Democrats.

    Got it.

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  6. Modulo Myself says:

    Trump is a hardcore rascist. Everybody gets that. And his supporters are also committed racists. Everybody gets that as well.

    Here’s the catch–unlike Romney and McCain, who had to devote time to proving they were like some xenophobe in SC–Trump doesn’t have to do that. He can turn to the center and try to present himself as a moderate without worrying a second about the white supremacist turnout.

    More importantly, even as he goes to the center, he can really try to get the white vote in the South and in NE states he stands no chance of winning electorally. He could lose the electoral college but win the popular. if that happens, does anyone think the GOP will simply defer to the law? I don’t.

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  7. Pch101 says:

    “Republicans could forget, for example, about winning a state like Florida…”

    About 29% of Florida’s Hispanic population is Cuban-American. I would not presume that their views would be aligned with the rest of the Hispanic population, which is dominated by those of Mexican origin.

    A lot of states dominated by Hispanics are already spoken for (California,Arizona,Texas), so it doesn’t really matter from Trump’s perspective if he upsets them there. I would think where this might create some issues would be states that might be swing states, such as Nevada and Colorado. If you start with the 2012 electoral vote map, then I would think that the GOP would aspire to at least turn Colorado.

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  8. JKB says:

    How does the recent set back in federal court to the Democrats and Obama DOJ in their illegal immigrant suffrage efforts affect this?

    Interesting the Hispanics are turning out to not be as racist as Blacks, who openly admit they supported Obama due to his skin color. Hispanics are not flocking to the two(2) Hispanic candidates in this race and instead apparently are going for the very old white people.

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  9. al-Ameda says:

    @Guarneri:

    Ok. So he’s unpopular with those who break the law or condone breaking the law, and who contribute to wage suppression or support wage suppression and growing income inequality, like Democrats.

    Interesting, Republicans are the most ones interested in low wages and wage suppression. Most low wage right-to-work states are Republican states.

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  10. al-Ameda says:

    @JKB:

    Interesting the Hispanics are turning out to not be as racist as Blacks, who openly admit they supported Obama due to his skin color. Hispanics are not flocking to the two(2) Hispanic candidates in this race and instead apparently are going for the very old white people.

    So, Black voters are ‘racist’ for voting twice for a candidate – Barack Obama – who advocated values and policies that they (Black voters) preferred over those of John McCain and Mitt Romney.

    Why in the world would Black voters be interested in voting to elect a man who would be the 1st Black president and who advocated policies that they supported?

    Do you believe that those same “racist” Black voters would have voted for, say, Clarence Thomas or Ben Carson if either was the GOP nominee for president?

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  11. An Interested Party says:

    And he’s going to pay for it…

    Oh not just him…the GOP will be paying for it as well…wouldn’t it be just tragic if Trump kept Republicans from having any say in who will replace Scalia on the Supreme Court…

    Hispanics are not flocking to the two(2) Hispanic candidates in this race and instead apparently are going for the very old white people.

    But of course they’re not because Hispanics aren’t stupid…

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  12. Neil Hudelson says:

    @JKB:

    Interesting the Hispanics are turning out to not be as racist as Blacks, who openly admit they supported Obama due to his skin color.

    And evidenced even more by the fact that they are just flocking to Ben Carson, right?

    Seriously, what happened to the semi-thoughtful JKB that visited here once in awhile?

    Edit:
    @al-Ameda:
    My apologies, I see you’ve already made this point.

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  13. PJ says:

    @JKB:

    Interesting the Hispanics are turning out to not be as racist as Blacks, who openly admit they supported Obama due to his skin color. Hispanics are not flocking to the two(2) Hispanic candidates in this race and instead apparently are going for the very old white people.

    African Americans are racists, only caring about skin color? That does explain the exodus from the Democratic Party by them this year to support Ben Carson. Oh, they didn’t?

    In 1984, when Mondale got 41% of the total votes, he got 91% of the African American votes. The other white guy running only got 9%. Or maybe Mondale wasn’t white? I’m confused.

    Edit: I see that al-Ameda and Neil Hudelson have already addressed this. Great minds and all that…

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  14. humanoid.panda says:

    Man, the quality of “arguments” from JKB and Guarneri shows that deep inside, they know that they are going to lose in November..

    I mean, a tytan of business like Guarneri should know that wage suppression is nothing but an operation of the law and supply and demand, right? Why the sudden flush of socialism, if not despair and desire to fling poo at walls?

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  15. kohler says:

    @Pch101:
    The Boston Globe noted on Dec. 8, 2015: “The Electoral College math doesn’t give the Republican nominee any room for error. In fact, Karl Rove reminded Republicans this month that they must win Florida to even have a shot at taking the White House.”

    Paul Ryan said, “If there’s a thing I learned from being involved in the 2012 election, it’s that we can’t have this Electoral College strategy with the margin of error of one state.” (August 21, 2014)

    Over the last few decades, presidential election outcomes within the majority of states have become more and more predictable.

    From 1992- 2012
    13 states (with 102 electoral votes) voted Republican every time
    19 states (with 242) voted Democratic every time

    If this 20 year pattern continues, and the National Popular Vote bill does not go into effect,
    Democrats only would need a mere 28 electoral votes from other states.
    If Republicans lose Florida (29), they would lose.

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  16. al-Ameda says:

    @Neil Hudelson:

    Seriously, what happened to the semi-thoughtful JKB that visited here once in awhile?
    Edit:
    @al-Ameda:
    My apologies, I see you’ve already made this point.

    De nada, Neil.
    On JKB? Well, I know from my own family experience (8 of 10 are very conservative Fox viewers), that many Republicans are very frustrated by race, feel that they are unfairly singled out on racism issues, and they have come to genuinely believe that reverse racism is a bigger problem than the historical brand of racism that we know. What JKB said above I’ve heard expressed in my family. Perhaps JKB is in that mode?

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  17. Tyrell says:

    First of all, I am not a Trump voter. But I know a lot of people who are Trump supporters and I can tell you that they are not racists. The favorite tactic today is to call someone a racist when they don’t agree with them. Trump had not said anything that could be considered racist. I don’t think that opposing illegal immigration s racist.

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  18. C. Clavin says:

    @Tyrell:

    Trump had not said anything that could be considered racist.

    WHAT FWCKING PLANET DO YOU LIVE ON???
    In his announcement speech he said all Mexican immigrants are rapists and drug dealers.
    He sent out a tweet with made up statistics about blacks murdering whites.
    He accepts support from white supremacist groups.
    He claims thousands and thousands of Muslims were cheering as the World Trade Center fell on 9/11…and when it’s pointed out that never happened he simply doubles down.
    Trump is running the mos explicitly racist campaign since Wallace in 1968.

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  19. C. Clavin says:

    This post is fatally flawed. Trump will win the hispanic vote. Just ask him.
    http://time.com/4153109/donald-trump-im-gonna-win-the-hispanic-vote/

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  20. C. Clavin says:

    @Tyrell:
    You are always whining about the jobs that have gone away from your town…it’s people like Trump that are behind that. If you are going to vote against your own interests…don’t whine about the results.
    http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2016/02/trump-wont-bring-our-jobs-back-from-his-hotels.html

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  21. JKB says:

    Actually, I just find it amusing. Like Larry Wilmore of The Nightly Show who stated specifically that he voted for Obama because he’s black. But then 5 minutes later tore into Ben Carson.

    And when brought up in his panel, his Hispanic American contributor claimed without humor that Rubio and Cruz were not Hispanic because they didn’t embrace Hispanic activism.

    Then again, according to many here, the Republican Party is the party of old white people. You know, like Hillary and Bernie, or Biden or Warren. As opposed to a diverse party of like, Cruz, Rubio, Nikki Haley, Jindal, Carson, Mia Love, etc.

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  22. HarvardLaw92 says:

    @Modulo Myself:

    Trump is a hardcore rascist. Everybody gets that. And his supporters are also committed racists. Everybody gets that as well.

    Trump is a hardcore carnival barker. He’s playing a racist on TV at the moment because it sells well with the Republican base (which is the bigger problem).

    If that circus suddenly found a love for needlepoint, he’d no doubt be stitching away on national TV before close of business. He essentially has no principles beyond whatever will cause people to pay attention to him. I’ve known him professionally now for over a decade, and that’s all he’s ever been about.

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  23. An Interested Party says:

    As opposed to a diverse party of like, Cruz, Rubio, Nikki Haley, Jindal, Carson, Mia Love, etc.

    BWHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If you really think that the GOP is “diverse” because of these few tokens, than you are even more delusional than I thought…here’s a hint, a party is diverse if it has a diverse group of people who regularly vote for it…you know, like the Democratic Party…

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  24. C. Clavin says:

    @JKB:
    Dude…buy a dog, name it Clue…and then you will have one. (But it will likely run away.)
    No self-respecting Cuban would ever label themselves Hispanic. Which only goes to show the depths of your understanding of race.
    Having lived in Miami I can tell you that if you refer to a Cuban as an hispanic or latino they will climb up in your grill and let you know;

    I’m a Cuban-American, you come mierda!

    That means shit-eater…and yes…you are.

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  25. HarvardLaw92 says:

    @JKB:

    Hispanics are not flocking to the two(2) Hispanic candidates in this race and instead apparently are going for the very old white people.

    Your statement indicates a great deal of unfamiliarity with “Hispanics”.

    For starters, they are not a monolithic bloc of voters united in groupthink by their brownness (something which the GOP is apparently incapable of grasping). They have cultural divides and demographic rivalries / dislikes like any other group.

    Huge among those cultural divides / dislikes? People who hail from Latin America, generally speaking, and Mexicans in particular, do not like Cubans. They consider them to be arrogant & entitled, and they deeply resent the “get to the beach and you get to stay forever” policy which Cubans, and only Cubans, enjoy.

    Cruz and Rubio are Cuban, and the rest of the Hispanic community who aren’t can tell the difference – even if you and the GOP can’t.

    That aside, why would any demographic support a party which is essentially using them as a boogeyman to motivate its white base? Latinos supporting the GOP is like insects supporting RAID.

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  26. gVOR08 says:

    @HarvardLaw92:

    If that circus suddenly found a love for needlepoint, he’d no doubt be stitching away on national TV before close of business.

    See, you still don’t get Trump. Trump would not pander by doing needlepoint on TV. Trump would pander by talking about what a great needlepointer he was, and how his love of needlepoint is yuuuge, how he had a special place in his home for needlepoint,and how he’d be the best needlepoint President ever. Like his religion, no needlepoint, just talk of needlepoint.

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  27. C. Clavin says:

    @gVOR08:

    no needlepoint, just talk of needlepoint.

    Republicans are just talk….think Bush about Bin Laden right after 9.11…and their predictions for the Iraq invasion and occupation…or tax cuts growing the economy fer chrissakes.
    blah blah blah…and it don’t add up to nuttin’

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  28. SenyorDave says:

    @gVOR08: Like his religion, no needlepoint, just talk of needlepoint.

    You are so cynical, Trump himself has declared the bible to be his favorite book. My guess is that it really is, and has a cherished place in his home. He probably has a gold leaf table with one leg too short, and his bible is just the right size to even out the table.

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  29. Guarneri says:

    @al-Ameda:

    Nice diversion. Save it for your fellow intellectually dishonest buddies here. Obama wants immigrants. Hillary wants immigrants. Hell, NY wants illegals voting.

    It’s all about the votes, and the middle and lower class be damned.

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  30. Guarneri says:
  31. Tony W says:

    @Guarneri: Is that scheduled to happen before or after Jade Helm & Ebola?

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  32. gVOR08 says:
  33. Pch101 says:

    Zero Hedge has a nice selection of tinfoil hats available. (Those never go out of style.)

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  34. Ebenezer_Arvigenius says:

    @Guarneri:

    Here’s your future. Enjoy.

    Sooo. The US states are going to fight over who gets to house the Mexican migrants and will threaten to disband the constitution unless the distribution is changed … or something.

    Really, you seem to understand the problem even less than the author of that piece and that’s really an achievement.

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  35. C. Clavin says:

    @Guarneri:
    So that post you linked to was written on the 25th.
    Are you promising that if the EU doesn’t collapse by the 7th of March you will finally STFU?

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  36. C. Clavin says:

    @Guarneri: @Guarneri:

    the middle and lower class be damned.

    Talk about projection.
    The party you support has been waging war on the middle and lower classes since Reagan took office…and continues to do so currently.

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  37. steve says:

    “Ok. So he’s unpopular with those who break the law or condone breaking the law”

    That is correct Drew. All Latinos break the law or condone doing so. They are also all rapists. Don’t forget that part.

    Steve

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  38. Pch101 says:

    @kohler:

    As I noted, about 3 in 10 Hispanics in Florida are Cuban-American, so I would not presume that they share this antipathy toward Trump or ensure that the Dems have Florida in the bag if Trump is the Republican nominee.

    In effect, when we discuss Hispanic-American political voting blocs, we should really carve out the Cuban-Americans among them because they aren’t in league with others in that group.

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  39. HarvardLaw92 says:

    @Pch101:

    I think you have to stratify those Cubans further by age. Fully 1/3rd of the Cubans in Miami arrived after 1980. Their reality is more one of being economic migrants than political exiles, and they maintain close ties with the island. The second and third generations springing from the original wave, generally speaking, care less about Cuba than the first generation does.

    Now, granted, that first generation votes more consistently than the following ones do, but that generation is dying a little further every day. Even someone who came in the first wave as an infant is now in their mid 50s, and most of that wave was considerably older.

    Broader point being that 1 or 2 in 10 (and I’m leaning towards 1) is probably a more accurate depiction of the number of Florida Hispanics that Trump could conceivably consider as being in the bag for him if he’s nominated. The number likely to oppose him is probably larger.

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  40. Pch101 says:

    @HarvardLaw92:

    In 2012, Obama won Florida with 50.01% of the vote, less than a 1% margin above Romney. Of course, Florida is winner-take-all (as is virtually every other state), so nobody has a lock on its 29 electoral votes.

    Non-Cuban Hispanics are more inclined to support Democrats, anyway, so the GOP doesn’t lose much in the short run by alienating them. (This is a problem for the party over the long haul, but not immediately.) Obama did manage to move more of them to the Dem side, but immigration isn’t the hot button issue for them that it is for other Hispanics because they don’t face the risk of deportation.

    A state like Florida might be won by the GOP more on the margins, such as getting more social conservatives to show up. Irritating the Hispanics may alienate some of them, but it might also get more whites to turn up. (Whites are 78% of the population, and they ain’t all liberals.)

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  41. Pch101 says:

    @Pch101:

    I meant to say above that Obama moved more Cuban-Americans to the Dem side, but there are still quite a few who are Republican.

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  42. HarvardLaw92 says:

    @Pch101:

    Right. The broader point was mainly “I wouldn’t assume that Cubans will deliver Florida to the GOP in November”.

    Romney’s support came mainly from the Panhandle and the GA border counties. Interestingly, Miami-Dade was one of Obama’s strongest Florida carries in 2012. Obama improved his share of Cuban American votes from 35% in 2008 to 48% in 2012. I’m thinking that demographic trend doesn’t move in favor of the GOP going forward.

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  43. Pch101 says:

    @HarvardLaw92:

    The GOP has a long-term problem with demographics. But there are still a lot of white people, and for now, it’s smart politics to beat up on minority groups, at least in certain districts. Values voters want their candidates to be modern Jim Crow proponents, and are turned off by those who don’t advocate that kind of tribalism.

    This stuff really has to be mapped out. The fact that non-Cuban Hispanic hate Trump doesn’t mean much because most of the states in which they tend to live aren’t going to change, anyway. Then again, if the GOP wants to win the White House, then it would be nice for them if CO, NM and NV weren’t moved from the “difficult” to “impossible” category.

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  44. HarvardLaw92 says:

    @Pch101:

    Agreed. To win, they have to carry every state Romney carried AND flip an additional 64 electoral votes. Essentially Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania and some other state. My thinking is they can’t do it, certainly not with Trump at the wheel. His polling along independents is abysmal. The GOP needs to be attracting the center away from the Dems if they expect to win. This doesn’t seem like the way to accomplish that.

    I’m watching to see what this anti-Hispanic push does to NC. Last time I checked they were up to about 13% Hispanic. That may be all it takes to flip NC blue again. If it does, the GOP is dead in this presidential cycle.

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  45. David M says:

    Here’s a good article about the coming Demographic disaster for the GOP.

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  46. Monala says:

    @C. Clavin: I have noticed that of late rightwingers have been using terms like, “income inequality” and talking about the poor and working class more. I find it interesting that all of a sudden, it’s this big concern for them, after years of mocking these issues.

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